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affect future laws and could overturn as many as 170 laws on the books. so this would be endlessly litigated and gives union bosses more authority than the legislature. >> so, what kind of laws would be -- that have been passed that most people in michigan would say, we have come to live with them, the were settled democratically, people agreed, the legislature passed them, the for signed them. we had elections afterwards. what laws would be overturned? >> there are two laws in particular that they're concerned about. one is the so-called 80-20 law which says that taxpayers don't need to pay more than 80% of public employees pension benefits. and the other one is a law basically regarding teachers. the fact that there have been some school reforms that have allowed various merit measures and teacher promotion measures that could also be overturned by this. this is something that michelle rei, the former dc schools chancellor who runs a students first group, is very concerned about and her group made a big ad in michigan to fight this. >> governor rick snyder, the republican in mich
of the indianapolis star, piloting the senate race there. they said results are flawed. they indicate laws wants a toss up is now a double digit lead for his opponent. most significantly, women voters are driving the divide, according to the new poll. joe donnelly with 47% support. richard murdock support. and the libertarian getting about 6% of that support. silver like indiana. paul on our line for republicans. good morning. caller: good morning. host: your reactions on what is going on in your state? caller: our country was built on a religious freedom and also, in our old west -- and in the history of becoming a free country, a lot of our beliefs were made of on the bible. they say life begins at conception. and have been hearing democrats talk about rich people. but you know, i think there are just as many or more rich people and the democrat sector of politics than there are republicans. because republicans did very heavily to charity. host: tell me who you are voting for in the senate race? caller: i will vote for the republicans. host: richard murdock was to mark the bank yes sir. i beli
the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and alicia. ♪ this girl is on fire [ male announcer ] use any citi® card to get the benefits of private pass. more concerts. more events. more experiences. [ jack ] hey, who's boring now? [ male announcer ] get more access with a citi card. [ crowd cheering, mouse clicks ] >>> voter suppression law has an ugly link to the 2000 voting mess. that's next. a cup of johan is a 600 horsepower sports coupe that likes to hug curves. ♪ your curves. smooth, rich, never bitter, gevalia. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast-
the libel make markets more transparent, stable and efficient. from george washington university law school, and this is 45 minutes. >> good morning. i am paul berman, 19 of the law school as art said and i want to welcome you to this conference and obviously welcome mary schapiro, chairman of the securities and exchange commission. so one of the things that i think makes this law school, the george washington university law school distinctive and different from other top law schools is the degree to which we are integrated into the real world of law and policy practice in this country. so one of the things we are always striving to do this not be an ivory tower academic institution solely, but also one that is always trying to engage the practicing bar, people from corporations, people who are not lawyers in the educational enterprise and also when public policy discussions. obviously we have a great advantage in being in washington d.c. and having so much access to the world of policy. but in addition, it's not just the location. it has to be your orientation as a law school. so it is som
of the biggest tax increases since 1980 facing us. >> huge. >> if, under current law, nothing is done. we have a list of these tax increases. >> the lowlights. >> yes. expiration of the bush cuts, a lot of the tax increase. the personal income tax brackets which are now going to pop up again, taxes on investment, a lot of of the obamacare taxes, 22 billion starts this year. that includes the new tax on investment there. >> 3.8% on people who make above $200,000, and medical devices, one of the most -- a real growth industry. >> i mean, that's one of those that you can't figure out how that became law but it did and we have to live with it. i want to emphasize, we get idea to talking about ten-year plans. this is in 2013, 500 billion -- you're talking about a tax increase of over 3% of gdp. so this is a massive blow to the economy that is going to happen unless congress acts or we get a new president with a new direction. >> steve, you talked to a lot of people in the business community. how are they reacting to this prospect? is this affecting the chance we could go over this tax? is it affect
the law because they feel like they are losing is wrong. what? by ensuring that all voters get to cast ballots? why on earth would a republican governor want to decrease early voting? well, it could be because the democrats aren't losing, they're actually kicking butt in early voting. according to an internal obama campaign document today that is exactly the case. here's what that document reveal reveals. in florida over a third of expected voters have already voted. as you can see early voters 50% voting for president obama. obama, 44% for mitt romney. election day that means mitt romney has to get 53% of the vote in florida if he's going to win. so that is a pretty hefty tag to run up. that's all according to the obama campaign. in iowa over a third of voters have already voted there. and among those early voters, you can see 64% of those are supporting barack obama. 35% of them are supporting mitt romney. and that means that mitt romney is going to need to win 59% of election-day voters. in north carolina, nearly half of all ballots have already been cast. and of those who have alr
the existing law and involved in the in that examinations of the impediments to affect the resolution and we are working on a cooperative basis to overcome those. so in conclusion, dodd-frank is certainly given the significant new responsibilities to address these risks associated in the recent financial crisis. you take these responsibilities seriously and we are ready to use these authorities when they are needed. hopefully not. but while the key provisions are now in place, we are continuing to implement the remaining provisions in rulemaking and we continue to refine our thinking on the process we increase transparency in the rest of the market's on these powerful new tools and how they can best be used to maintain financial stability and end to big to fail. i look forward to participating in the q&a. thank you very much. [applause] >> now for the downside. first i want to thank you professor bachmann for organizing this. it's an excellent panel i must say and i've always enjoyed being on the panel with space and rick. laughter come i want to take on everything that was said, so let me g
delegation, six democrats. pennsylvania law speak to the apportioning process. the republican-controlled legislature essentially redrew the congressional boundary lines, moving some seats that were vulnerable in the eastern part of the state, three of them in at the philadelphia suburbs, one of them, one of them in the lehigh valley and one of them up in scranton. basically running the west and south to try to pick up more republicans without getting into the details of it -- karen lives in one of those areas where the boundary lines were redrawn. i do not know which congressman -- that might be in the 15th, with charlie dent. that was the lehigh valley seat. then out comes down to south central pennsylvania. or she could be in a seat held by a republican, lou barletta. that district was redrawn -- that district now comes the whole way down to the state capital, picking up more republicans. here is a way to think about that at the moment -- in competitive terms. nobody believes, independent analysts, nobody believes that of the 18 congressional seats, that more than two of the
spokesman. republican policies that have been being pushed by republicans for years, welfare reform, law and order policies, demagogued as racist, racist, racist, and when nixon says "law and order" we know what he's talking about. no law and order policies instituted by reagan and bush judges, rudy guiliani, bless his souls, tens of thousands of black lives were saved. when welfare was reformed, black lives were saved in a different way. welfare and law and order were so successful, bill clinton claimed credit for both. [laughter] we had 12 years of paradise, that's in the chapter, post-oj pair dice describing wonderful things that happened. people are not walking on egg shells anymore with the list of words you just mentioned. people had to be worried back then you would innocently say a word that would be deemed racist. you would ruin your career. you would be -- you would be hated by all of human kind. that was over after oj. a lot of the change after oj was really very subtle, but it was a wonderful thing that happenedded for race relations in america. that faded, it happened a long
our presenting event sponsor, the law firm of hush blackwell, and our media sponsors, ksdk news channel 5, st. louis public radio, and the st. louis business journal. ksdk is televising this broadcast live to its affiliates across missouri. st. louis public radio is affils across missouri. st. louis public radio is doing the same. the broadcasts is also been streamed live on ksdk.com and stlpublicradio.org. we also invite you to take part on social media on twitter. finally, our appreciation to the city police and fire department, as well as the school district of clayton for hosting tonight's event. before we begin, i'd like to review the debate format. each candidate will give a 3- minute opening statement and a 3-minute closing statement. next, our panel will ask questions of both candidates. both candidates will answer the same question and have one and half minute to do so. rebuttals will be at the discretion of the moderator and will have 45 seconds. after that, we will take questions from the audience, who received an index card as they entered the auditorium. they were a
parenthood. it didn't become law, and the government didn't shut down. you didn't have to -- >> moderator: gentlemen, i guess let me jump ahead to a topic i was thinking of taking up later, but since it's on the table, congressman dold, your opponent says that on the 20 most important votes you did not break with your leaders even once, and that led the tea party to pull congress to the fringe. what is your response? dold: that was, actually, 24 votes. 20% of those votes pass with the the democratic majority. ten of those volts tenny hoyer voted for. not a single one talked about women's health care, the environment, not a single one was talking about transportation infrastructure, not a single one of those votes were dealing on education or a single one on gun control, all things that i think are important to the people of the 10th district and i think are critical votes -- [inaudible conversations] schneider. if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective in our lifetimes, he voted twice with the ryan plan. he talks -- he voted with this congress over 200 times
and biofuels. either in the law and started researching and i said what about cannabis. she said best there is. magnitudes better than corn or slowly and i said but? don't you know? we are not even allowed to talk about it. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. conservative political pundit ann coulter presents her thoughts on race in america next on booktv. the author speaks at the four seasons hotel in los angeles for 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you for bringing ancient history, elbow to elbow. that is the key as everyone knows. it is an honor to be here. trivial information. forget it when you are out the door. it is an honor to be here. having been an actor simon recovered actors who is now in my right mind and my left brain but having been there for a long time i appreciate the club and all the statement has done to create the first oasis in the desert that is hollywood. thank you for that. really appreciate it. [applause] deeply appreciate all the amazing work that david did. you were magnificent on all the news channels exposing the travesty of the current a
dozen states had laws against interracial marriage. >> narrator: he would not see his son for ten years. >> barry obama had a pretty unsettling childhood. i mean, he didn't ow his father. his mother was very loving and protective, but she was also finding herself. basically, he and she grew up together. >> she then became involved with an indonesian and married him and had a child with him. so she had two biracial children from different cultures who she raised largely by herself. >> narrator: they lived in jakarta. he was now called barry soetoro. his stepfather lolo was troubled. >> he's drinking quite a lot. there's evidence of at least one act of domestic violence against her. >> narrator: stanley ann taught english. while she worked, barry had to learn how to cope. >> imagine what it would be like at age six to be thrown into thn chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where h
to their name. that is by law. so it's very easy to target black voters. now, as it turns out i started going through these names. i will give you one name, okay? from in the book here where i show you the actual purge list in "billionaires & ballot bandits." there is a mr. robert moore convicted of a felony crime and so all the black robert moore's in florida lost their. there are a few in florida but not only robert moore's from florida but brought moore, bobby more's they said these were covers for for the spell in trying to, including mrs. bobby moore. mr. moore gets convicted of a crime and mrs. bobby moore loses her vote but they got thing -- one thing right. she is b. al: a and by the way when i say she is, this is not from kathryn harrison's list. this is from a current list used by the state of florida, in which every single voter on this list, everyone, no exception, their only crime is voting while black. we can't find -- "the new york times" took four years to pick up the story for me, for years and it was on top of the bbc nightly news and they said the list was flawed. no, it's
with you. the body of law and rule is incredibly complicated. some of that does pertain to the evil banker hypothesis. i'm amended hereby the corollary evil lobbyist hypothesis, but i would add my own cause, which is the cubicle regulator aided and abetted by the expert lawyer hypothesis. and maybe in my practice i spend a lot of time. and the bells of these rules. and when you say okay, i think i had it. here's the definition of proprietary trading. some lawyer will say well, actually there was lawler versus knickerbocker case in 1842 in which that definition was not upheld -- so for this to be really clear, with another 52 pages in the federal register. that may be good lawyering, but it is incoherent rulemaking. i don't know what to do about it. i just say this is one of my personally favored hypotheses is a big problem of complexity risk and why i go back to a few clear standards to which real institutions accountable, i written on the poker rules mav is hispanic@. we have to make some clear decisions here. this current come in never never land that's largely constructed by people to d
by republicans for years, welfare reform, law and order policies, but they were demagogue is racist, racist, racist. when nixon says law and order we know what is really talking about. instituted by bye bye reagan-bush judges and rudy giuliani, bless his soul from new york city, tens of thousands of black lives were saved. when welfare was finally reformed tens of thousands of black lives were saved in a different way. welfare was so successful in law and order bills were so successful they were claiming credit for both. so we had 12 years of paradise within the chapter, post-o.j. paradise and many wonderful things that happened. most of all people were not walking on egg shells anymore. add to the list of words you just mentioned. people would worry about that you would innocently say a word and it he would ruin your career and you would be hated by all of humankind. that was over after oj and a lot of the change after oj was very subtle but it was a wonderful thing that happened for race relations in america. that faded, it happened a long time ago and along comes barack obama the most li
if the court continues down the path of sitting dog sniffs are not searches at all, law enforcement will be completely unfettered to use drug dogs however they wish. that could lead to a random sweeps of neighborhoods where people. limited and only by the restrictions the fourth abutment has on seizures. more broadly, again, as technology develops, if the court continues down the path of sitting there are some searches that, a detect contraband and are not searches at all, the encroachments on our privacy are going to increase ever further as technology moves on. >> i was a little puzzled as to what the florida supreme court really meant -- really wanted in the harris case. it is not just enough to say the dog has been certified, you need more performance evidence. how would that work? every time there is a case where drug evidence is used, the prosecution would have to come and and a show, what, there is some sort of test? he has gone out 100 times -- what would be the evidence that would be enough to convince a judge this dog was reliable? what's the traditional test for probable
. states can independently pass laws. they have the power to award electors. the winner of the natural popular vote, if and only if there are states with 270 electoral votes making the same pledge. you are not going to be a sucker. you have created a compact. eight states have done that in the district of columbia, if i'm not mistaken. we don't need a constitutional amendment? >> it wasn't just my idea. my brother, co-author -- >> the brothers. all right. >> for this idea. we can talk about -- so far, the states that have gone for it are democrat states. >> thanks for being here. appreciate it. >> all right. the second term agenda for barack obama. that's next. ngs! a mattress. a sausage link. mermaid. honey!? driftwood. come on, you gotta help us out here a little. [ male announcer ] febreze eliminates odors and leaves carpets fresh. ♪ [ male announcer ] febreze. eliminates odors and leaves carpets fresh. ♪ [ male announcer ] jill and her mouth have lived a great life. but she has some dental issues she's not happy about. so i introduced jill to crest pro-health for life. selected
will not be counted that day. in fact, the law says they can't be counted until ten days after election day. so you have hundreds of thousands of votes that will not be counted until november 17 in ohio and if it's close, there is no way we will know what actually happened. >> if i wind up voting in ohio we have other problems tonight besides that. i want to have you look at the political theater that we saw today. you have the republican key noter of the convention in august along with the democratic president that he lambbusted in tampa. what did you make of that scene tonight and how does this factor into this discussion that we had about the tone of rhetoric between politicians on both sides of the aisles. >> it's a far different tone. i mean, i call them the odd couple. you can't but chris christie, the republican governor, was really responsible in many ways for mitt romney being nominated as you said was the key note speaker. right after the first debate said this guy is his candidate, mittroomy in will turn the -- mitt romney will turn the campaign upside down. but chris christie also wants
. they passed 26 laws in hundreds of states. they have here a woman who is attacked, called a slut for wanting access to contraception and a candidate that just said, i wouldn't phrased it that way. exactly how would he have phrased it? >> that's a false narrative. >> i don't want to get off the topic of women -- okay. i will give you that time. i want to get to the impact on swing voters so-called by "the new york times" waitress mom and what is this going to do to the pitch battle in ohio, in florida, in virginia for women voters in the united states. >> we see the so-called waitress moms. we love the heart of tagging that. >> fancy that. >> these are women who typically voted for president obama in the last election cycle. but are struggling with, we are struggling economically has he upheld his promise and still don't love romney as an option either. we are seeing and talking about the women's issues, they are family issues. these are household issues. they are economic issues. access to healthcare, access to birth control. how many kids we have, those are economic issues. it's going to co
over to lawyers, does anything that's happened involve the absentee voting law a ground work for any challenges on the road? >> i don't think so. we're hoping this is an extension that we have requested and there's several in northern virginia that had to close their offices in the interest of public safety. we're pretty confident with working together that they are going to be extensions of time for people to vote and then we have no reason to believe that all of the places will not have the power restored by the end of the week. there should be no disruption and we ask the citizen to make sure that they vote and the can at this times were nice enough to cancel the appearances on sunday for mitt and monday for the president, so they will be back no doubt again starting on thursday. everybody should be able to vote. >> governor for virginia. we thank you. >> thank you for having me on. >> we invited the mayor to join us, but he was unavailable. early voting will resume tomorrow and it was canceled for two days because of the storm. the voting hours have changed. early voters can cast
, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ fox news weather. east coast bracing for one of the worst in decades. hurricane sandy posing a serious threat for folks from washington to maine. several governors declared an emergency and residents are urged to stosock up on food, water and battery. latest information is that sandy is strengthening again. don't let this fool you. it is not a typical hurricane or storm. it is the pressure that dropped 99 milibars. and a stronger storm than you typically see. and in the northeast main land making the track by the time we get to monday afternoon. it is bad news for the jersey shore and long island. there may be storm surge right where you see the l-shape. the water goes in and no way to get out. we are concerned about beach damage . look at the model predictions. 11 inches. and that is in the outer banks. new york city and 7 in baltimore and the storm is going far inland and across far interio
to the military budget is the controversial bill which congress passed and the president signed into law last year to confront the nation's looming $16 trillion debt. the law requires automatic across-the-board cuts on january 2, 2013 that will slash billions from the defense budget. in battleground states like, virginia, where as many as one in four adults work for defense contractors, which build enormous sub marines like the minnesota which is about to be christened these defense cuts could mean as many as 200,000 jobs. it was designed to be so bad we would never get to this point. mike is ceo for huntington ingalls industry. with 37,000 employees in virginia, mississippi, laz and california it is the largest u.s. naval ship builder. >> all of the usual is suspects are saying all of the things that they were predicted to say. it is not the way the nation should be going about deciding how to allocate its resources. >> congressman randy forbes for the fourth congressional district in virginia. >> it is going to be devastating to the economy of virginia. it going to be devastating to the economy
. it happens at the largest he jumped into is a church yard. my mother-in-law joked that was convenient. if anything went wrong we could wheel him straight on into the church. but he's doing very well. they're both doing really great and we treasure our time with them. general na is going every month to get video footage of her grandparents and telling stories and she wants to have that both for his library but also just for her and all of the family to have this footage of them because they're so terrific. now let's g get to what we're really here for which is to thank you all very very much and to encourage you to keep working every single day, keep going door to door and making those phone calls and make sure all of those people you contacted turn out to vote on november 6. it's really really important that we have the ground game that wins which and i think you all have set it up so that's what we'll have in michigan and i want to thank you all for that very much. i've been with ann romney lately. we did a reception together in oklahoma city and she is so terrific. and i think every
out of an airplane. it happens at the largest he jumped into is a church yard. my mother-in-law joked that was if anything went wrong we could wheel him straight on into the church. but he's doing very well. they're both doing really great and we treasure our time with them. general na is going every month to get video footage of her grandparents and telling stories and she wants to have that both for his library but also just for her and all of the family to have this footage of them because they're so terrific. now let's g get to what we're really here for which is to thank you all very very much and to encourage you to keep working every single day, keep going door to door and making those phone calls and make sure all of those people you contacted turn out to vote on november 6. it's really really important that we have the ground game that wins which and i think you all have set it up so that's what we'll have in michigan and i want to thank you all for that very much. i've been with ann romneywe did a reception together in oklahoma city and she is so terrific. and i think everyo
. >> it'd be pretty difficult for him to actually repeal the healthcare law within 24 hours. he would need to go to congress and we'd still have to wait and see if republicans are in control of the senate or the house. >> sarah kliff covers healthcare issues for the washington post. while she says democratic control of the senate would throw a wrench into romney's plans, there are immediate steps a romney administration could take to start to undo obama's signature piece of legislation. >> one option the romney administration could pursue is not offering funds to the various departments that are supposed to implement the health care law. that could really slow down and make it very difficult to implement the law even if it were left standing as a law. >> for all the rancor surrounding the legislation, the percentage of americans with medical insurance has barely budged since the law was passed 31 months ago. according to the census an estimated 84.3 percent of americans had medical insurance last year compared to 83.7 percent the year before. because of the legislation, a few million young
beloved cousin and in law. prayers as you move through this season of sorrow. and of grief. thank you for sharing george breathes with you. profoundly george stanley mcgovern as a son an example of our heritage, i each of you for coming celebrate and honor senator mcgovern's life and witness. to share the mcgovern family's brief. to political colleague, a trusted mentor -- [no audio] and prairie form them to embrace common person and to tirelessly worked for the common good. george mcgovern was also a prairie prophet. he called and inspired an generation to do justice, to love mercy and to walk with our god. he focused the world's on the plight of the hungry. fought for peace. he called on us to repent a misguided, wasteful, and selfish to seeking and speaking the truth. articulate it in his hometown to and not in nazareth to preach the good news to the poor, to be prisoners, to give sight to the blind and to proclaim the year of the lord's savior. we can learn much from jesus' experience in bringing good to the poor and liberating the oppressed. of teaching and preaching in galilee.
exploded. the court decision wiped away the gray area in our campaign finance law. so now there are no limits to what outside groups can do. and so what we're seeing now is an explosion in that area. although it's a problem that existed before citizens united. >> i want to pick up on what leslie was saying earlier. the 501(c)(3)s -- these are all named obviously for the codes, for the tax codes. the 501(c)(3)s where we actually see an enormous number of progressive action going on in these non-profits, they are barred. they can't write these checks. so to me that's where it feels like there is part of this critical asymmetry occurring. is that right, the difference between the threes and fours. >> there are ones that aren't ideological at all. sometimes the group that benefits a local library is a 501(c)(3). it's charitable organization. a c-4 can spend in elections. because there are so many wealthy donors and corporations on the right, this election cycle to defeat president obama, they are pouring money into these groups that don't have disclose -- >> that $74 million s
many states that were trying to do a voter suppression with the idea laws, now we have won the most of that. now we have to be careful that the accurate count is given. everybody in the campaign has to be ready for recounting. if it goes to the supreme court, but we have to go there. host: are you still there? caller: it must be fair. host: from our twitter page -- steve is joining us from virginia on the republican line. caller: there is no such thing as a voter suppression, that is just silly. there is a voter fraud as was revealed by james keene where he recorded the son of jim moran telling somebody how to commit of voter fraud. there are lots of dead people that are registered. that was the purpose of this to get the dead people off of the voter rolls. the process is going forward in virginia. everybody who registers in virginia gets a voter i.d.. it is a responsibility. a lot of people did not want to have anything to do with responsibility. host: thank you for the call. eight romney ryan white house, it could happen. -- a romney-biden white house, it could happen. the magic n
-span2. now more from the fordham law school conference. next, we hear from former cia acting general counsel john rizzo, and former justice department inspector general lyn fine. posted by the center on national security, this is an hour 20 minutes. >> okay, marty has charged us with finding all the solutions, and luckily i'm only the moderator so i would have to charge the three of you with giving us some solutions. i think the way this panel is organized is to provide context for what you just heard. i hadn't quite realized it would work as a will that we have the right people to give the right context, both in terms of the law, in terms of the post-9/11 decade and where it's taken us, in terms of the self-regulating institutional function of government, to figure out its own problems, make its own recommendations and maybe suggest its own solutions. and in terms of what all this means from the point of view of working in the field, on the ground, inside a covert realm. so we're going to try to tie this all together today by looking at some of these issues. and i have to trust that
today. it also puts our community at ease. especially our law enforcement community. >> more than 30 law enforcement officers and 50 agent from the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and fire arms were involved in tracking stewart down and capturing him. he'll be extradited back to virginia to face numerous charges. >> the public responded and our law enforcement partners rose to the challenge and took this predator off the street. >> investigators say stewart maintained a website and apparently used it to taunt police who were looking for him. >>> an update now to several violent attacks in the district. police have arrested two more men in connection with the eastern market beating that left a man severely beaten. police believe the group is linked to at least nine separate attacks. >>> four days until election day and president obama is making up for the lull in campaigning because of the superstorm. the president was back on the campaign trail yesterday making appearances in wisconsin, nevada and boulder, colorado. tomorrow the president will be in manassas and will get a boost from former p
wall street." he is now a senior fellow and adjunct professor at the new york university school of law. neil barofsky, welcome. >> thank you. >> when you were a kid, did you say, "mom, dad, i want to grow up and be an inspector general?" >> no, i said i wanted to be a lawyer, though. >> you did? >> it must be some sort of major genetic flaw i have. but my mom keeps a fortune cookie that said, "you will be a great lawyer one day." and i signed it and dated it. i thini was 12 years old.12 so there was something weird about me that i wanted to be a lawyer. i wanted to be a prosecutor. i mean, that was sort of what i wanted to do. maybe it's from watching tv shows, "perry mason," as a kid or something like that. but i was always drawn to the law. and so i think i did have this drive for public service. but certainly never did think that i'd be an inspector general one day. i didn't rlly even know what ll that was until i actually got at the job, to be honest with you. >> when you took the job, i read about you. and i thought, "why is someone like that, with that record of prosecution going
, law and order, welfare reform, were actually able to be implemented walking on egg shells, terrified they are going to say some word that's going to be deemed, you know, an incipient klan sentiment and that's why the crux of my book is the turning point of the o.j. verdict when i think white america saw black people cheering the acquittal of an obviously guilty black celebrity and said that's it, the white guilt bank is shut down. not only did that help race relations, it specifically helped black people as republican policies that had been pushed for years but demagogued as racist, law and order, welfare reform, were actually able to be implemented helping black people most of all. i mean, helping everyone but helping -- giuliani's policies in new york saved tens of thousands of black lives and i don't know if he would have been able to continue with his very tough on crime policies which were in fact demagogued as racist while he was implementing them, if you didn't have this change in feeling in america where people were just sick of hearing of being accused of racism. >> let's ta
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